Juta Lember/1942

Eesti NSV Riiklik Kunstiinstituut, 1968

State Art Institute of the Estonian SSR, 1968

Juta Lember on sisearhitekt ja mööblidisainer. Tema loomingus on nii Standardile kavandatud seeriamööblit, hulgaliselt unikaalmööblikavandeid kui ka tervikinterjööre. Läbi aastate on tema ruumikäsitlus olnud põhijoonelt modernistlik, lakooniliste vormidega. Popkunsti mõju on tajutav tema värvivalikus, mis on paiguti lõunamaiselt särtsakas. Lember kuulus Moskva olümpiamängudeks ehitatud Pirita purjespordikeskuse interjööri autorite kollektiivi (1975–80), samuti on ta presidendi kantselei interjööriuuenduste autor. Viimaste aastate tähtsaimaks tööks on Peterburi Jaani kiriku interjöör (2011), mille eest anti Lemberile ka Kultuurkapitali aastapreemia.

Juta Lember is an interior architect and furniture designer. Her works include furniture series designed for Tallinn’s Standard Furniture Factory, a large number of unique furniture designs, and also full interiors. Over the years, her spatial approach has featured mainly Modernist, laconic forms. The influence of Pop Art can be perceived in her colour selection, which is occasionally bright and lively. Lember was a co-author of the interior of the Pirita Yachting Centre (1975–80, built for the Moscow Olympic Games), and worked on the interior renovations of the President’s Office of the Republic of Estonia. One of her most important projects in recent years has been the interior of St Petersburg’s St John’s Church, for which she also received the Annual Award of the Cultural Endowment of Estonia.

Interview. Juta Lember (excerpts)

5.50-6.32

I have had many private clients but it is in a public project that you can do things that you believe in. You have to have a sense of responsibility – not do things just because you like them or because they are fun. Of course, the client is there – the society is the client. And the sense of responsibility only emerges from realising the true weight of the project.

8.20-10.14

Architects work from the exterior inwards. An interior architect starts from figuring out how to move around, live, walk inside the building. There are probably some specific differences between the two professions. If I take a plan of a building, for example, then the first thing I look at is how the plan works; this is the basis for everything else. How to move inside the building depends on many things. I can sense right away the scale of furniture items or how they could possibly be placed inside that room. This is where the differences between the two professions could lie. Leaving aside the building, one must listen to who the people in the building are, what do they do, how do they move around, what their needs are.

Technology and materials per se only serve a function – they need to work for the benefit of the people. The human being is the centre of it all and the technology has to cater to him.

You have to have a feel of things. How do you feel about the room? If there is no feeling, the result will be no good.

3-toalise maaelamu mööbel ja sisekujundus, diplomitöö, 1968, juhendaja E. Velbri, põhiplaan

Furniture and interior design for a three-room rural dwelling, graduate project, 1968, supervisor E. Velbri, floor plan

3-toalise maaelamu mööbel ja sisekujundus, diplomitöö, 1968, juhendaja E. Velbri, perspektiivvaade elutoast

Furniture and interior design for a three-room rural dwelling, graduate project, 1968, supervisor E. Velbri, perspective view of the living room

3-toalise maaelamu mööbel ja sisekujundus, diplomitöö, 1968, juhendaja E. Velbri, perspektiivvaade magamistoast

Furniture and interior design for a three-room rural dwelling, graduate project, 1968, supervisor E. Velbri, perspective view of a bedroom

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